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Live the Creative space

April 27, 2012

Signwriting in the modern context.

 

LEARN TO SIGNWRITE

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The Usual Mega Business!

Welcome all!  This is going to be a big fun learning curve… dedicated craftship skills, honing in on the real brushwork dynamics and training you, the next generation of signmasters.  

Yep it’s no circus, never OIAFS, and always the business end of training… go be success!

Next Course Booking   Contact Nick  07960113799


Nick Garrett: Genuine skills

Fantastic course would definitely recommend it… covered a lot over the course of the 2 days from techniques to the best materials to use. Great creative atmosphere and good insight to sign painting.   

Cool Vibes at NGS sign training!!

Quality learning – value, concise and solid training delivered in a way that makes absolute sense … and it works right there in your hand.

You’ll walk out of the studio able to make real headway as a sign painter.

4 Ways of Sharp Corners:  An assured way of making it perfect every time.

4 Ways of Spacing: Again a solid breakdown of how to sort kerning in the bag.

This course is delivered using the method featured in the forthcoming Laurence King publication ”The Art of Sign Painting” – by Nick Garrett.

LINK LINK LINK >>>

How to Paint Letters - NGS 001

Clear format techniques and learning sheets deliver an easy to grasp, precise methodology.

Step by Step practice tutorials.

B stroke play 72


Hi this blog is all about solutions in design, for design, via design… enjoy and leave a cool comment or two

Nick Garrett

Contact me directly ngsfwt@outlook.com

NGS Unit 205 Regent House Business Centre, 291 Kirkdale, London SE26 4QD

 NGS Video capture

Kirkdale Funk Night Sugahill Cafe

July 11, 2017
Chris Arch DJ
Chris is a dedicated reggae, funk and groove man with over 15,000 superb rare groove tracks ready to spin.
Working the turntables for a fair while he is the very real ‘real deal’.
Check him out at Kirkdale Funk.

 


  1. About to happen live in

  2.  Retweeted

    I’ll be celebrating my 50th in London at Kirkdale Funk, Sydenham with Steve Clancy & Chris Arch.

Authentic by hand doesn’t automatically make it good!

November 5, 2016

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I love Roman lettering, retro USA casuals and London sans serif… when done right and taught correctly. That’s my job… it’s what I do and lay my reputation on.

London signwriting is at a crossroads. One way is rough USA copy, import casual … Bad shapes, newbie mismatch layout, roughly done… without a shread of the heartland and even industrial beauty that the original stuff had… the other way is real, solid signwriting, working hard at creating fabulous lettering.

To say London is eclectic and thrives on this mix is a cop out… if the emerging rash new casual poster gothics and casual handwriting styles were any good I would be the first to praise. Cities, Villages and outposts thrive on great workmanship. Most casuals being slapped up is cop out shit, borrowed USA styled without a glance at origins, local culture and roots. It’s like saying McDonalds is fine because it’s got it’s place… the bin. Don’t kid yourself – the tradition of great USA and UK writing is built on quality and depth.


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Above: One weekend with NGS and Dawn is making really beautiful quality work around UK.

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Casuals are a deft art. I remember arriving in Perth Western Australia and seeing window splashes being belted out – rough trade sales tagged up beautifully… those guys with dayglow rollers know their shit and painted fast as a lizard’s tongue, in 46 degrees, with tough coat water colours – in hellfire conditions they somehow still paint like a dream.

Guys like Downer, and Stevens shoot/shot out iconic doms as fast as a terrier’s eye. Slipped out the cup, all slick and ace high lettering. But you don’t learn that on day one or two, ask any pro.

There are, of course, some very talented signwriters today who can make sensational casual letters let’s be clear about that. Mike Meyer, Pierre Tardif and  James Cooper-Yourman’s (Dapper Signs Bristol) brilliance stand out and I love their astounding work. But what I am talking about is the rash of new SWs who start out learning this stuff from the up and go, thinking it’s the dogs nuts. Learn that stuff from a master – when you have the basics nailed.

So I’m not here to snipe – I’m here to push people to go hard and not accept mediocrity. Mediocrity often comes from graduating yourself too quickly.

Often I set a task and there’ll be one or two in the class that will get bored and jump ahead… I pull them back because otherwise they will start thinking they have the ability to run when they need to polish their boots first… before they even walk.

A half hour of tough boring stuff really strengthen the mind and self discipline.

They also need to trust my judgement and get into the moment which is sitting there waiting at the tip of the brush.

Hendrix was an incredibly technical master of his instrument…say no more.

 

Painted letters day with Nick Garrett

Casual writing is secondary text… but don’t be fooled – it’s the most difficult too

I learnt my trade from one of the great casual writers, Andy Whitmore but there was no way I could do what he could do in the first year of training… so I adapted over the years. Yet his technique entered my bones and brush… so too did his relentless standards.

Casual cursive is an art… probably one of the most difficult aspects of writing. It comes from a tradition of poster or ticket writing. Those guys were working on hundreds of tickets a day and were literally paper sign autopilots, turning out beautifully executed work… cheap, effective and volume production.

It was never about quality in the same breath that a signwriter would approach a letter but about quality in the breathless sense of fast, spontaneous execution. As a form I personally love it… but to teach it off bat is misguided.

To teach Day One based on this style is frankly a joke. Yet we see Mike Meyer and Better letters doing just this. Look I love what the big man can do… but it’s not focused enough for newbies to grasp in day one or two. It’s not the best way to get young writers started up.

Yep this is a square roundhouse article criticising the way signwriting is being taught and how that import culture, when done on the fly, is fucking up designs, artists and identities. A really good casual letter is the most difficult thing to do… walk first.

Painted letters day with Nick Garrett

Too much – too hard

Definitely not saying you need to do a 5 year apprenticeship either. But the cart goes behind the horse and over graduating yourself can waste a lot of time in the medium term.

I have students lapping up the nuggets of info and lettering skills I teach… a few complaining from time to time that I teach too much info on the day. Chloe Tickner stated just that the other week, only to go out the studio and succeed on the basis of what I had laid down as key principles.

”But people just can’t remember all that info!” She retorted.

”Well write it down on the free pads I supply!”

You can’t cut corners. But don’t complain to the teach about forgetting crucial gems during the weekend. Bring a journal, create your story.

Above: Chloe Tickner after Day 2 in Signsmiths – 1 month later she’s gone pro – 7 months later she’s solo.


This is not a game. This is a craft. The bottom line is the top line and first line. Learn the detail and apply this detail to everything you do.

I just want a fun weekend though – Don’t you want to be a signwriter?

You cannot be a recreational sign writer in this industry because too many people are going to rip you down. It will be done occasionally to your face on Facebook and constantly behind your back. Jealousy is rife. I have it all the time… a few years ago it devastated me – today I know the score.

But if you want spend 3-400 quid for a weekend of dabbling with the brush it won’t happen in my studio. The first thing you will discover is it will cost a lot less than that, in an NGS Signsmith weekend, passion and absolute love for the brush and craft hits you and strengthens your practice. You will be inspired. Exhausted and yet empowered.

It will happen elsewhere though – not in an NGS weekender. Dabbling… a bit of guru heroism and nice guy fun.  But that really isn’t going to be a game changer for you. Because it’s lightweight.

I want it to develop your professional capacity and make London or wherever more beautiful with fabulous lettering.

Newbie Signwriting has to step up right now. Not by overdressing lettering but but crafting and becoming genuinely discerning. Historical knowledge enriches shape.

The art is not about having fun it’s about exhilaration and craftsWmanship.

in house

But London is eclectic now

London can be eclectic on the basis of great design, applying USA culture of lettering across the city in a way that works – most of the stuff going up isn’t so much brutal/industrial but pig assed ugly. But be aware of what happened when the hamburger joints did that saturation blitz during a period of 70s and 80s ignorance… today Subway and Maccas are trash outlets painted green, struggling to gain a foothold in a more genuine health based, fast food landscape.

But the past will always haunt KFC and co. It will haunt a lot of small businesses too if they opt for crass design and rough painting.

Do we really want risk the inflow of junk type?

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Say it

I remember Pete Hardwick at the first showing of Signpainters the movie turning to me saying ”This isn’t signwriting Nick… it’s poster writing”. A few writers shuffled a bit standing alongside in earshot.  I agreed with Pete.

Never a truer letter written, nor word spoken for quality.

Recently I ran it by Jack Hollands who said he feels London is the better for USA CAZ  (…rough?) letters and shared his genuinely open mindedness about the new type look about town. Shaking the place down it is.

Actually it’s not.

It’s shaking down people’s businesses because once you commit to that casual look and your neighbour competitor opts for something more tasty, you’re going to have to renew your vows as you watch sharp style clean up the Tee shirt fashion sign identities.

Casual is a style made for temporary, low budget delivery.

It’s got no legs.

And great looking cities are built on these four pillars:

Culture – Design – Power – Strategy

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Some type can look cheap as chips yet remain very tasty over time.

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Above x4: Pop culture artworks exude real style. Design has to be top notch to recreate such iconics.

 

The role of good, genuine teachers

When faced with a weekend studio full of mixed aptitudes the application of a common denominator principle of teaching what looks like an easy typeface, falls apart by the following Tuesday afternoon for the learner, as the student ponders what did they really get from it all.

A great teacher builds principles that all students can understand and address in their own way and uses examples that clarify all stages of development. Block letters are tough but ideal for that role. No place to hide with a sans serif, it keeps it all honest.

Casual letters are really difficult to master because they are often built around weaves and loops – different to every hand and dependent on ‘The Hand’. A bad casual offers no clarity for a student to easily identify root problems and causes and thereby fix.

A block letter does show exactly where the student is weak and needs to focus – it shows them where they are strong too.

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But teaching blocks and Romans is hard work. Tough going on the teacher and the student. But if it’s done in a kinetic way, showing links to both historical and dynamic contemporary contexts, it’s nothing short of mesmerising what a student can achieve.  It’s the stuff that stays with an artist forever. It’s so pure, unrivalled and clear it renders everything else pale.

That’s why it is an addiction that is good for you.

Below: My first block and script Brewery sign in 1982 for Watneys

Flemming Pub written 1981 Nick Garrett

Young master Tobias Newbigin below worked with me for a year making great letters By Eye, By Hand , By Heart.

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Above: NGS Soho Bold with blended drop shade. Solid, modern and beautiful… learn it with us.


And then you can dress it. Just as Daisy Emerson does.

I remember Daisy coming into my studio in the morning and leaving a signwriter by the evening. She proved it by her own excellence and taking a job off me the next day going pro.

I took a look at that job the other day – Clarendon bold. She did good.

So if you wanna have fun – have fun. But paint the right letters… the right way and don’t get caught up in the BS.

NEON Giving Team GB an edge Brazil 2016

August 9, 2016

UK Sport Performance Pathway Team
Giving Team GB an edge

Being seen as the leading edge within UK Sport and Team GB Sports.

Long-time Neon client UK Sport is the government body responsible for strategic investment in our most talented athletes.

Kind words…

“This was a fantastic job!”

To find out more: info@neon-creative.com or call +44 (0)20 3289 1733 Share this: Email,Google+, LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook, Download PDF


UK Sport Pathway Performance Team logo with Project Area descriptor and iconic athlete silhouettes.

UK Sport Pathway Performance Team logo with Project Area descriptors.

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UK Sport Pathway Performance Team literature and the Project Area literature suite.

Other projects you may find of interest…

Research showed design is the most highly employed creative sector in the UK

August 5, 2016

Research showed design is the most highly employed creative sector in the UK

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Design training and new revival Signwriting courses NGS London


 

An extensive report from research charity Nesta and Creative England has shown that design is performing exceptionally well compared to other creative sectors.

Between 2007 and 2014, the research shows that design had the highest employment rates, and has the most number of businesses as well as the highest turnover, alongside the software and digital sector.

It also proves that the creative industries as a whole are growing faster than any other business sector in the UK, with its Gross Value Added (GVA) totalling £84.1 billion in 2014.

While London is the most thriving location for the creative sector, responsible for 40% of jobs, the report highlighted other nationwide hotspots, such as Glasgow, Brighton and Liverpool.

 

The makers of the report hope the research will act as sufficient evidence for government to invest more in creativity, and to focus on developing areas outside of London.

The report reads: “Over half of Local Enterprise Partnerships fail to mention the creative industries in their strategy plans. We hope that [this] evidence…will persuade some of them to…take action to boost the creative industries’ growth that is taking place on their doorsteps.

“We also believe that national and devolved governments can play a more active role to scale up creative clusters outside London and the South East.”

 

More support needed at local and national levels

Despite the high levels of growth and productivity among creative sectors such as design, the report also suggests that more support ought to be offered to creative businesses on both a local and national level.

“Over half of Local Enterprise Partnerships fail to even mention the creative industries in their strategy plans. We hope that the evidence that we have presented in this report…will persuade some of them to…take action to boost the creative industries growth that is taking place on their doorstep,” says the report.

“We also believe that national and devolved governments can play a more active role to scale up creative clusters outside London and the South East, with well-resourced, locally relevant interventions along the lines of Nesta’s previous recommendations.”

“Power of the creative industries to drive jobs and prosperity”

Caroline Norbury, chief executive of Creative England, adds: “This report clearly shows the power of the creative industries to drive jobs and prosperity – not only in London and the south east, but in communities across the UK.

“”It is more crucial now than perhaps ever before, that we work together to make sure our creative industries are equipped to play their part in driving a strong economy and maintaining our position as a world leader in an increasingly competitive global marketplace.”

Don't buy corp junk

 

 

 

 

Instagram overhauled its app design with a new Stories feature

August 5, 2016

Instagram overhauled its app design with a new Stories feature

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Instagram has taken a turn towards fleeting photo and video reels, which disappear after 24 hours – a strikingly similar feature to rival social media app Snapchat.

Snapchat Stories also lets users personalise photos and videos with emojis and images and “draw” on them with text and paintbrushes.

The UX design update takes the social media platform away from static images and more towards a moving, living reel of action – perhaps a shift that complements Instagram’s rebrand earlier this year, which saw it drop its vintage-looking camera icon for a more modern, minimal look.

Many social media apps are turning to live media now, with Facebook – which owns Instagram – investing heavily in 360° video and silent/subtitled video for its mobile newsfeed advertising, and Snapchat of course kicking off the temporary video clip trend in 2011.

The Surreal Life Aboard the World’s Biggest Cruise Ship

August 4, 2016

The Surreal Life Aboard the World’s Biggest Cruise Ship

Photographs by Alberto Bernasconi

WTHF would drive anyone to want to board this massive chunk of Mad Hatter’s madness!!?? Let’s find out – freak show!!

August 1, 2016

With the Harmony of the Seas‘s maiden voyage in May, Royal Caribbean eclipsed itself—besting its sister ship Oasis in size by a foot. Stretching 1,188 feet long and 215.5 feet wide, the gleaming hulk is a veritable floating suburb devoted to sun, fun, and waterslides. Population: 8,880.

The ship is gargantuan. The AquaTheater on the stern of the ship, an amphitheater-style entertainment space, showcases professional aquatic acrobatic and synchronized swimming performances and goes off at night with water and light shows. That climbing wall is 43-feet high (and there are two).
The ship is gargantuan. The AquaTheater on the stern of the ship, an amphitheater-style entertainment space, showcases professional aquatic acrobatic and synchronized swimming performances and goes off at night with water and light shows. That climbing wall is 43-feet high (and there are two).
Photograph by Alberto Bernasconi
Spread over 18 decks and seven "neighborhoods"—connected by 24 elevators—the Oasis-Class Harmony of the Seas is capable of accommodating close to 9,000 passengers and crew. Here, guests have souvenir photos taken in the Royal Promenade neighborhood.
Spread over 18 decks and seven “neighborhoods”—connected by 24 elevators—the Oasis-Class Harmony of the Seas is capable of accommodating close to 9,000 passengers and crew. Here, guests have souvenir photos taken in the Royal Promenade neighborhood.
Photograph by Alberto Bernasconi
The ship's Central Park neighborhood—an open-air section in the center of the ship—is a key design feature, with some 12,000 live plants in a meandering garden than spans more than the length of a football field.
The ship’s Central Park neighborhood—an open-air section in the center of the ship—is a key design feature, with some 12,000 live plants in a meandering garden than spans more than the length of a football field.
Photograph by Alberto Bernasconi
Guests enjoy the carousel in the amusement park-style Boardwalk neighborhood.
Guests enjoy the carousel in the amusement park-style Boardwalk neighborhood.
Photograph by Alberto Bernasconi
Suspended nine decks up, a zip line takes guests on a ride across an open-air atrium past some of the ships 2,747 staterooms. Tucked completely inside, 524 staterooms have "virtual balconies" that stream real-time video of what you'd see if you had an actual window.
Suspended nine decks up, a zip line takes guests on a ride across an open-air atrium past some of the ships 2,747 staterooms. Tucked completely inside, 524 staterooms have “virtual balconies” that stream real-time video of what you’d see if you had an actual window.
Photograph by Alberto Bernasconi
A trio of waterslides collectively called the Perfect Storm look out over the ship's Central Park and pool decks.
A trio of waterslides collectively called the Perfect Storm look out over the ship’s Central Park and pool decks.
Photograph by Alberto Bernasconi
Guests in the Boardwalk neighborhood.
Guests in the Boardwalk neighborhood.
Photograph by Alberto Bernasconi
A diner in Harmony of the Seas' main dining room, which is spread over three floors. For drinks later, robot bartenders at the Bionic Bar can shake up custom cocktails.
A diner in Harmony of the Seas’ main dining room, which is spread over three floors. For drinks later, robot bartenders at the Bionic Bar can shake up custom cocktails.
Photograph by Alberto Bernasconi
The Ultimate Abyss dry slide is the tallest slide at sea—10-stories high with a drop of 100 feet.
The Ultimate Abyss dry slide is the tallest slide at sea—10-stories high with a drop of 100 feet.
Photograph by Alberto Bernasconi
An afternoon art auction aboard the ship.
An afternoon art auction aboard the ship.
Photograph by Alberto Bernasconi
Sunbathing in the Pool and Sports Zone. This "neighborhood" stretches the length of the ship with four types of pools, two surf simulators, a zip line, and views of the Boardwalk and Central Park neighborhoods below.
Sunbathing in the Pool and Sports Zone. This “neighborhood” stretches the length of the ship with four types of pools, two surf simulators, a zip line, and views of the Boardwalk and Central Park neighborhoods below.
Photographer: Alberto Bernasconi
The Royal Theater is the main performance space and largest entertainment venue on the cruise liner. It can seat 1,380 guests. The current show: Grease, the Musical.
The Royal Theater is the main performance space and largest entertainment venue on the cruise liner. It can seat 1,380 guests. The current show: Grease, the Musical.
Photograph by Alberto Bernasconi
Harmony Dunes, the nine-hole mini golf course.
Harmony Dunes, the nine-hole mini golf course.
Photograph by Alberto Bernasconi
The three-story, adults-only Solarium enclave sits toward the bow of the ship, with four cantilevered whirlpools suspended 136 feet above the ocean.
The three-story, adults-only Solarium enclave sits toward the bow of the ship, with four cantilevered whirlpools suspended 136 feet above the ocean.
Photographer: Alberto Bernasconi

the top 10 Richest countries in the world

July 14, 2016
 

This 13 richest countries by gross domestic product (at purchasing power parity) per capita. Using the purchasing power parity (PPP) value of all final goods to show true value of dollar within a country in a given year. Oil nations continue to dominate the list in 2015 as they did in 2014.
13 – Austria – $46,223 GDP (PPP) per capita
Austria ranked 10th richest nation

The alpine nation has a population of about 8.5 million people with a healthy per capita income of $46,223, which is about four times higher than the per capita income for the average person globally. Its robust service sector and its proximity to Germany provide a ready market for its steel, iron and agricultural products. The Capital city, Vienna is the fifth richest metropolis in Europe behind Hamburg, London, Luxembourg, and Brussels.

12 – Netherlands – $47,633 GDP (PPP) per capita
Netherlands ranked 8th richest nation
With 16.8 million people, and a per capita GDP of $47,633, the Dutch are more than just a tulip country. Its success comes from three key sectors: mining, agriculture, and manufacturing. Many people do not know that the Netherlands is actually a kingdom of four countries: Aruba, Curaçao, the Netherlands and Sint Maarten but the Netherlands makes up 98% of the total land area in the Kingdom.

11 – Ireland – $48,755 GDP (PPP) per capita
Ireland ranked 9th richest nation
The Emerald Isle has a per capita income of about $48,755 with a population of about 4.8 million people. The main industries that boost its economy are textiles, mining, food production, staple products in any economy. In OECD (Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development) rankings, Ireland actually places 4th overall.

10 – Saudi Arabia – $51,924 GDP (PPP) per capita
Saudi Arabia is one of many oil-based economies with strong government control over major economic activities that enjoy high GDP. Its GDP (PPP) per capita is $51,924 as it possesses 18% of the world’s proven petroleum reserves, ranks as the largest exporter of petroleum, and played a leading role in OPEC for many years.The petroleum sector accounts for almost all of Saudi government revenues, and export earnings. Despite possessing the largest petroleum reserves in the world, its per capita income dropped is much smaller than of that of smaller Persian Gulf neighbors.

9 – The United States – $54,630 GDP (PPP) per capita
USA ranked 6th richest nation
While most nations on the list have small populations (relatively), it is impressive that the world’s largest economy, the United States, can maintain a per capita GDP (PPP) of $54,630, considering its population of over 310 million people. Reasons behind its success include its large domestic automotive industry, technological sector that foster innovation, and a system of democracy that protects entrepreneurial and intellectual property rights.
8 – Switzerland – $57,235 GDP (PPP) per capita
Switzerland ranked 7th richest nation
The GDP (PPP) per Swiss citizen is $57,235. Swiss banking and financial institutions keep this country and its economy afloat. It is important to note that some of the wealthiest people and companies in the world own Swiss bank accounts and therefore Switzerland has excess capital to use for investment purposes. Zurich and Geneva, Switzerland’s most well-known cities, have consistently ranked among the top ten highest living standard cities in the world.

7 – Norway – $64,856 GDP (PPP) per capita
Norway ranked 4th richest nation
This Nordic nation’s per capita GDP of $64,856 allows its 4.97 million people to reap the benefits of a small yet robust economy. Driven by fishing, natural resources, and major petroleum exploration, Norway is the eighth largest exporter of crude oil, 9th largest exporter of refined oil, and 3rd largest exporter of natural gas in the world.

6 – The United Arab Emirates – $67,674 GDP (PPP) per capita
The United Arab Emirates ranked 3rd richest nation
This Middle Eastern federation of emirates has a land area of about 32,278 sq. miles, which means it could easily fit within New York State (54,556 sq. miles). With a population of 9.2 million people, it’s a bit more populated than the state of New Jersey. A third of the $67,674 per capita economy comes from oil revenues, while the service sector and telecommunications also contribute significantly. The UAE is the second largest economy in the Arab world after Saudi Arabia.

5 – Brunei – $71,185 GDP (PPP) per capita
Brunei, a small country with a wealthy economy that is a mixture of foreign and domestic entrepreneurship, government regulation and welfare measures, and village tradition has led to GDP per capita (PPP) of 71,185. It is almost completely supported by exports of crude oil and natural gas. Like other oil countries in the list the government has shown progress in diversifying the economy away from just oil and gas.

4 – Kuwait – $73,246 GDP (PPP) per capita
Kuwait is a small, relatively open economy and its citizens enjoy a per capita GDP (PPP) of $73,246. The highest-valued currency unit in the world currently is the The Kuwaiti dinar. With nearly 10% of the world’s oil reserves, petroleum accounts for nearly half of GDP and 95% of export revenues and government income. In recent years, Kuwait has done little to diversify its economy due to positive fiscal situation.

3 – Singapore – $82,763 GDP (PPP) per capita
Singapore ranked 5th richest nation
This tiny city-state has moved up from 5th position to take 3rd with per capita income (PPP) of $82,763, which is five times the average per capita income for an ordinary individual in the world. The basis of Singapore’s wealth is its financial services sector, a chemical export industry, and its liberal economic policies that encourage growth and innovation. Singapore has the second busiest port in the world, exporting $414 billion of goods in 2011 alone.

2 – Luxembourg – $97,662 GDP (PPP) per capita
Luxembourg ranked 2nd richest nation
A symbol of wealth, number two on the list has a per capita GDP (PPP) of $97,662, which is nine times the world average. The backbone of this strong economy is its vibrant financial sector, prudent fiscal policies, and dynamic industrial and steel sectors. Banking in Luxembourg is the largest sector of its economy with an asset base of over $1.24 trillion alone.

1 – Qatar – $140,649 GDP (PPP) per capita
Quatar ranked 1st richest nation
Qatar ranks number one on the list of the top 10 richest nations because of its high GDP (PPP) per capita of $140,649. Qatar has a well-developed oil exploration industry where the petroleum industry accounts for 70% of its government revenue, 60% of its GDP and 85% of its export earnings. Because of its wealth and economic success, it has been chosen as the host of the 2022 FIFA World Cup, the first Arab nation to ever hold this role. However, Qatar is also the most conterversial country on the list for its use of forced labour from nations throughout Asia and parts of Africa.

The 25 Richest Countries In The World Based On Purchasing Power Parity Of GDP Per Capita

View information as a: List Chart
Rank Country GDP per capita (PPP)

1 Qatar 140,649
2 Luxembourg 98,460
3 Singapore 82,763
4 Kuwait 73,246
5 Brunei Darussalam 71,185
6 United Arab Emirates 67,674
7 Norway 65,614
8 Switzerland 59,540
9 United States 54,629
10 Saudi Arabia 52,010
11 Ireland 49,393
12 Netherlands 48,253
13 Austria 47,682
14 Germany 46,401
15 Australia 45,925
16 Denmark 45,537
17 Bahrain 45,500
18 Sweden 45,297
19 Canada 45,066
20 Iceland 43,993
21 Belgium 43,435
22 Finland 40,676
23 United Kingdom 40,233
24 France 39,328
25 Oman 38,631

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